hell-on-high-heels23:

that odd moment when south park says something more beautiful and poetic than most television shows out there

no,like this guy here is the cutest fucking little ball of sunshine though.

(Source: south-park-gifs, via that-kid-in-the-drifloon-hat)

euro-trotter:

teamgold:

This College Girl Is A Teen Mom And She Has A Secret That No One Knows

Real thug tears

(via punk-fox-bitch)

"

When I was seventeen and preparing to leave for university, my mother’s only brother saw fit to give me some advice.
“Just don’t be an idiot, kid,” he told me, “and don’t ever forget that boys and girls can never just be friends.”
I laughed and answered, “I’m not too worried. And I don’t really think all guys are like that.”

When I was eighteen and the third annual advent of the common cold was rolling through residence like a pestilent fog, a friend texted me asking if there was anything he could do to help.
I told him that if he could bring me up some vitamin water that would be great, if it wasn’t too much trouble.
That semester I learned that human skin cells replace themselves every three to five weeks. I hoped that in a month, maybe I’d stop feeling the echoes of his touch; maybe my new skin would feel cleaner.
It didn’t. But I stood by what I said. Not all guys are like that.

When I was nineteen and my roommate decided the only way to celebrate the end of midterms was to get wasted at a club, I humoured her.
Four drinks, countless leers and five hands up my skirt later, I informed her I was ready to leave.
“I get why you’re upset,” she told me on the walk home, “but you have to tolerate that sort of thing if you want to have any fun. And really, not all guys are like that.”

(Age nineteen also saw me propositioned for casual sex by no fewer than three different male friends, and while I still believe that guys and girls can indeed be just friends, I was beginning to see my uncle’s point.)

When I was twenty and a stranger that started chatting to me in my usual cafe asked if he could walk with me (since we were going the same way and all), I accepted.
Before we’d even made it three blocks he was pulling me into an alleyway and trying to put his hands up my shirt. “You were staring,” he laughed when I asked what the fuck he was doing (I wasn’t), “I’m just taking pity.”
But not all guys are like that.

I am twenty one and a few days ago a friend and I were walking down the street. A car drove by with the windows down, and a young man stuck his head out and whistled as they passed. I ignored it, carrying on with the conversation.
My friend did not. “Did you know those people?” He asked.
“Not at all,” I answered.
Later when we sat down to eat he got this thoughtful look on his face. When I asked what was wrong he said, “You know not all guys do that kind of thing, right? We’re not all like that.”
As if he were imparting some great profound truth I’d never realized before. My entire life has been turned around, because now I’ve been enlightened: not all guys are like that.

No. Not all guys are. But enough are. Enough that I am uncomfortable when a man sits next to me on the bus. Enough that I will cross to the other side of the street if I see a pack of guys coming my way. Enough that even fleeting eye contact with a male stranger makes my insides crawl with unease. Enough that I cannot feel safe alone in a room with some of my male friends, even ones I’ve known for years. Enough that when I go out past dark for chips or milk or toilet paper, I carry a knife, I wear a coat that obscures my figure, I mimic a man’s gait. Enough that three years later I keep the story of that day to myself, when the only thing that saved me from being raped was a right hook to the jaw and a threat to scream in a crowded dorm, because I know what the response will be.

I live my life with the everburning anxiety that someone is going to put their hands on me regardless of my feelings on the matter, and I’m not going to be able to stop them. I live with the knowledge that statistically one in three women have experienced a sexual assault, but even a number like that can’t be trusted when we are harassed into silence. I live with the learned instinct, the ingrained compulsion to keep my mouth shut to jeers and catcalls, to swallow my anger at lewd suggestions and crude gestures, to put up my walls against insults and threats. I live in an environment that necessitates armouring myself against it just to get through a day peacefully, and I now view that as normal. I have adapted to extreme circumstances and am told to treat it as baseline. I carry this fear close to my heart, rooted into my bones, and I do so to keep myself unharmed.

So you can tell me that not all guys are like that, and you’d even be right, but that isn’t the issue anymore. My problem is not that I’m unaware of the fact that some guys are perfectly civil, decent, kind—my problem is simply this:

In a world where this cynical overcaution is the only thing that ensures my safety, I’m no longer willing to take the risk.

"

— r.d. (via vonmoire)

(Source: elferinge, via cronicallyawesome)

Tags: motivational

heyfunniest:

is this even a kid show

(Source: thespoonmissioner, via koreancracker)

Tags: motivational

livelikelarry13:

blackamazon:

ultralaser:

yabamena:

rectumofglory:

221cbakerstreet:

2brwngrls:

gnomebriela:

Most important NFL commercial to date!

MOTHERFUCKING WEELLLLLLPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPPP

BOOM

THIS IS SO IMPORTANT HOLY SHIT

BOOM

this again

all day every day

I’d like this played everyday till the name change . In Times Square , possibly projected onto  Mount Rushmore.

Whoa

kittenmogu:

BY CARLINA DUAN

When I was eleven, I was called a Chink by three boys at a water park. I was wearing my favorite blue Nike suit, had just gotten my first period a month before, and adored my fish tank of silver guppies, which swam mercilessly back and forth through a sleeve of cool water each night.

FULL STORY |

(Source: kittenmogu)

Tags: motivational

sherlokism:

wholockedmars:

fabled-foreigntongues:

I’m just going to leave these here.

GUYS. ARE YOU FUCKING SERIOUS. ARE YOU FUCKING SERIOUS RIGHT NOW. YOU’RE GOING TO STOOP TO TELLING PEOPLE TO KILL THEMSELVES? JUST BECAUSE THEY AREN’T LIKE YOU? THE LAST ONE, “chose to be straight AND cis” EXCUSE ME BUT LAST TIME I CHECKED, YOUR GENDER AND SEXUALITY WERE NOT EXACTLY A CHOICE. IF THEY WERE, GOD KNOWS HOW MANY PEOPLE WOULD ‘CHOOSE’ TO BE STRAIGHT. WOULD ‘CHOOSE’ TO BE CIS. BECAUSE BEING QUEER AND BEING TRANS*, FROM WHAT I’VE EXPERIENCED AND WHAT I’VE HEARD, IT’S NO FUCKING PICNIC. IT’S NOT FUN. I’M PRETTY SURE IF EVERYONE COULD CHOOSE, THEY WOULD ALL CHOOSE TO BE CIS AND STRAIGHT. AND I SEE YOU SECOND SCREENSHOT, CALLING ON ALL “white cishets” TO DIE. OK SO NOW WE’RE GOING TO TELL PEOPLE THEY NEED TO DIE BECAUSE THEY AREN’T PEOPLE OF COLOR? BECAUSE THEY WERE LITERALLY BORN AND THEY HAVE LIGHT SKIN? BECAUSE THEY CANNOT CHOOSE TO BE WHITE, THEY CANNOT CHOOSE TO BE CIS, THEY CANNOT CHOOSE TO BE HETEROSEXUAL ANYMORE THAN YOU CAN CHOOSE TO BE A PERSON OF COLOR WHO IS TRANS* AND QUEER. THERE IS NO CHOICE, AND YOU ARE LITERALLY TELLING PEOPLE TO DIE FOR WHO THEY ARE, AND THAT’S NOT OK. YOU CAN TELL PEOPLE THEIR ACTIONS ARE WRONG AND NOT OK AND EDUCATE THEM ON THEIR PRIVILEGES, BUT WHEN YOU START TELLING PEOPLE TO DIE AND TO KILL THEMSELVES THAT’S WHEN YOUR ACTIONS AND YOUR WORDS ARE NO LONGER OK AND I DON’T SUPPORT BULLYING PEOPLE INTO ACCEPTANCE.

Educate and mature. There is a line between jokes on how white/cishets are ignorant and how privileged they are and blatant bullying. IT. IS. NOT. HELPING. Others might find the excuse to pigeonhole and bash on us so, please. EDUCATE. and MATURE.

(via a-lone-quark)

maharetr:

meghanconrad:

so-nerdy-it-hurts:

royahie:

Piñata by Pages Matam (x)

I love this message, but I really love seeing men of color saying things like this—not because they are less likely to believe these things or more likely to support rape apologism, but because white people tend to be the ones who are gifed about serious issues, white people are the ones whose quotes get passed around with thousands and thousands of notes, white people are the ones whose words are taken seriously.

For a black person’s voice to be heard, it has to be stronger and clearer than a white person’s.

Too often, the only time black people get this kind of attention is just when they’re funny or fit into some stereotype—when they can play the part of Mammy or Independent Black Woman or Sassy Black Friend.

Also, I get that clicking and watching a video is a lot harder than looking at a gifset, but I would like to mention that this is one of those times when you really, really ought to click and watch the whole thing, because holy shit.

Echoing Meghan, because holy shit. Gutting and important.

(Source: emoticon1234, via ruminia)

"

An open letter to the ‘nice guy’ who tried to hit me because I stopped him from taking home a drunk girl who was begging him to leave her alone (or: why you should never ask a poet if she’s really an ugly cocksucker or if that’s just her day job):

The thing is, everyone assumes that by taking away our rights, you make us weak.

In reality, just the opposite occurs. We are used to the sling of insults - there is nothing you can say that hasn’t already been said to me. We are used constantly being on the outlook for our aggressor - so yes, I can spot an asshole from across the room and it’s because I often have to.

The thing is: you are making our skins thicker and our spines stronger than anyone who doesn’t have to put up with the shit that we do. We are the same generation that can wear pretty dresses and cut up your corpse in the same moment: because trust me, we know how to get blood out of our clothing.

You think women are little helpless flowers but I know at least a quarter of my lady friends with self-defense classes under their belts, at least half who can fight their way out of a chokehold with nothing but their carkeys like daggers in their fists, at least three-fourths who are so used to any kind of slur you can throw at them that they have four witty comebacks just resting on their backburners, and all of them - all of them - are baptized in the fire of another person’s violation, whether verbal or otherwise. You are not making the submissive housewives or the shy secretaries of your wet dreams. You have made dragons.

You have made mothers with sharp teeth who can balance eight different tasks and still remember your favorite dinner. You have made CEOs who do better work because they’re used to being told they’re sub-par. You are making artists and poets and musicians who’ve seen the dark in the world. You are making social justice warriors - I use this not as a defamation but as a banner, as the way they brand themselves because it is a battle, isn’t it, and nobody’s come out without their share of scars - you are making a generation of caustically beautiful ladies who have seen more shit by six a.m. than you have all your life and they still walk better in heels than you do in your boat shoes.

We do not invite your ‘nice guy’ into our beds, you’re right, because the nice guys of our lives have been our fathers asking us if we ‘are really going out in that,’ have been our best friend telling us that his girlfriend should give up sex because he’s paid for dinner, have been our uncles and brothers and the great gentlemen who hang out of their cars and laugh when the thirteen-year-old they just honked at jumps and looks terrified (but should totally accept the compliment as if it was a gift instead of the moment she recognizes she’s never going to be safe) -

you wanna know why we don’t let nice men into our beds? Because we rarely find them.

They’re out there, I know it, but they’re not the ones wetting themselves when a woman asks ‘why do you think that?’ instead of sitting back and letting him laugh with his buddies about femi-nazis. They’re out there and they’re probably as pissed as we are that at least one third of their population has openly admitted there are times when they think it’s okay to force their significant other to have sex: they’re out there, and the sad thing is, if you’re a male, you’re statistically not one of them. As far as we know, you don’t exist. You are a white knight only you believe in.

Here’s the thing about forcing people down: eventually they’re going to get strong enough to push right on back, and when you’ve spent the whole time sitting on your ass sinking your teeth into your healthy wage gap, you’re not going to be ready for it.

You’ve hurt us, over and over. When the time comes for us to hurt back, do you know how many of us are going to ask ‘Where was the mercy when I was begging like he is now? Where was that mercy when I got pregnant? Where was that mercy when I was called selfish for being a single parent? Where was that mercy when he forced himself on me? Where was that mercy, in anything?’

The thing about oppression is that it can only last for so long. You are not making yourself dominant, you’re making yourself weak. I’ve seen men crumble because they feel uncomfortable when they get hit on by other men as if the stench of their own mistakes is strangling them. I’ve seen them get impassioned because a teacher preferred females and I’ve laughed because I had eight other classes where it was reversed and in all of those eight, it went uncontested. I have legitimately punched a boy who said that a show for girls was shameful because it tries to teach lessons instead of catering to his desire for sex - as if just by liking something, he owns it. I’ve seen boys growl about women’s history month and had to wonder if they’ve ever held a textbook where the only names of girls are tiny footnotes. I’ve seen fathers ask why the curriculum I use for my six-year-olds is carefully gender neutral, why I let his son play at cooking or his daughter be a doctor.

I have never heard a mother complain except to beg me to get her little girl to talk more, to do more, to succeed - do you see? Do you see?

Here’s the thing about stepping on us: we have learned to stop licking your boots
and now we want to ruin you.

"

trust me, I know actual nice guys and they are nothing like your type. p.s your fly was down the whole time. /// r.i.d (via inkskinned)

This just in, dragons are a new symbol of femininity and I am down for that.

(via misandry-mermaid)

(via all1sees)

Tags: motivational